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Score voting for national elections

The all-or-nothing voting system of the United States is a strange beast that encourages unnecessarily strategic voting at the expense of each voter's principals. Have y
The all-or-nothing voting system of the United States is a strange beast that encourages unnecessarily strategic voting at the expense of each voter's principals.  Have you ever voted for someone because they were the "least among the evils"?  On the other hand, have you ever felt more than a single candidate was appealing but didn't want the "split the vote" so you picked the safest bet?

Score voting is a simple voting approach that does away with these regretful situations and allows you to give each candidate a score, as if you were grading the candidates on a school test.  Brian's Taskforce recently added a task resolution "voting" system that was inspired by score voting.

The score range used in Score Voting can vary, but my preference would be 0 to 100 since this would naturally align with most peoples' understanding of test scores.  When Score Voting has a range of 0 to 1, it's called Approval Voting because either you approve of a candidate (you gave them a 1) or not (you gave them a 0).

See the description of Score Voting at the Center for Election Science for more information.

You may also want to check out iSideWith, a simple survey of political stance questions that maps your support among the 10 (who knew there were 10, right?) candidates running for President of the United States in 2012.  The outcome of the survey is a percentage score showing how much your views align with a given candidate.

Imagine if you could take those numbers and put them right into the November ballot.
Any form of score voting used for national elections, including approval voting (score range 0 to 1)
Popularity  (by allocation of committed bounties)
Score voting with a 0-100 range
 
$ 150
No preference
 
$ 30

Comment #8 posted by keithReport

Donated $25 to American Red Cross.

Comment #7 posted by bhauerReport

Donated $25 to Electronic Frontier Foundation.
In honor of adding the EFF as a charity option here at Brian's Taskforce, I figured I'd donate on behalf of one of my favorite tasks.

Comment #6 posted by bhauerReport

Donated $100 to Center for Election Science.
To celebrate the Center for Election Science becoming a 501(c)3 non-profit, I'm donating $100 to them on behalf of this task.

Comment #5 posted by cborgiaReport

A candidate who supports Score Voting: Chris Borgia, Independent, FL: http://chrisborgia.com/positions

Comment #4 posted by bhauerReport

A site named " voting in sanity" provides another fantastic description of Score Voting.  Check it out.

Comment #3 posted by esandmanReport

I donated to Wikimedia since I like thinking of Score Voting as "the voting method of the internet age." Seemed like a good fit.

Comment #2 posted by esandmanReport

Donated $5 to Wikimedia Foundation.

Comment #1 posted by bhauerReport

Donated $25 and will be donating $15 upon task completion to American Red Cross.
I figured a high-profile national charity like American Red Cross was fitting for the first bounty.